Biomass energy and the reduction of greenhouse gasses in paper making

05/11/2009

Biomass energy and the reduction of greenhouse gasses in paper making

Zusammenfassung

The paper industry in Europe is the largest user of biomass energy and a new project between RWE npower renewables and papermaker Tullis Russell is further evidence of the industries commitment to low energy paper making.

Hintergrund

The plant, which will have an installed capacity of 50 megawatts, was required to replace the existing coal-fired power plant at Tullis Russell.

Die Fallstudie

A new state-of-the-art biomass facility has moved a step closer to reality with the signing of a multi-million pound deal. RWE npower renewables has recently concluded a contract with papermaker Tullis Russell to supply its paper mill at Markinch, Fife with heat and electricity from a new biomass-fuelled co-generation plant. The plant will have an installed capacity of 50 megawatts (MW) and will replace the existing coal-fired power plant at Tullis Russell. RWE Innogy will invest around £200 million in the biomass facility and have secured an additional £8.1 million support from the Scottish Government for the project.

The plant will reduce annual carbon emissions by 250,000 tonnes and generate 6% of Scotland's renewable generation targets.The investment is a major commitment by RWE and is in line with RWE strategy and Government policy to reduce CO2 emissions in the UK electricity sector.

The new plant will supply the Tullis Russell paper mill at Markinch, Fife with heat and electricity from a new biomass-fuelled co-generation plant. The development to build a biomass power plant on site will enable the company's products to be made with a very low carbon footprint.

The biomass project at Tullis Russell has been managed by npower Cogen's development team working closely with colleagues from across the RWE Group. Around 400,000 tonnes of virgin and used wood from a wide range of sources will be used to power the plant with contracts being put in place with local and national companies for the supply of biomass. The project will help to secure over 500 jobs at Tullis Russell, create over 50 permanent jobs in the operation of the power plant and a new biomass fuel processing facility as well as 400 hundred jobs during the construction phase.

The plant will reduce Tullis Russell's carbon footprint by 72% removing 250,000 tonnes of fossil fuel C02 per annum minimising the environmental impact of the operation on the local community.

First Minister Alex Salmond said: "This biomass facility will deliver significant economic and environmental benefits for Scotland - I am pleased this project is taking another positive step forward. The Scottish Government is supporting RWE npower renewables and Tullis Russell in their work to develop this multi million pound plant at Markinch with a £8.1M RSA grant. This new biomass plant complements the Scottish Government's work to create a greener Scotland and will contribute to our work to cut carbon emissions and increase the use of renewable energy."

Construction work will begin immediately and the power plant is scheduled to enter operation during 2012. In addition to this project, RWE npower renewables is developing plans for a similar biomass plant in Lincolnshire, with an installed capacity of 73 MW. Across Europe, RWE Innogy is aiming to build biomass plants with a total installed capacity of around 390 MW by 2013.

Ökologischer und wirtschaftlicher Kundennutzen

  • The removal of 250,000 tonnes of fossil fuel C02 per annum
  • Represents 6% of Scotland's renewable generation targets
  • Creates over 50 permanent jobs in the operation of the power plant and a new biomass fuel processing facility as well as 400 hundred jobs during the construction phase.
  • The development will enable the company's products to be made with a very low carbon footprint.
  • Reduces the impact of paper making operations on the local community

Unternehmensinfos

RWE npower renewables and Tullis Russell Papermakers.